Featured Post: Policing in the Library: A Case Study to Influence Library Policy and Practice

Image of a diverse group of people with the text: "Libraries are for everyone"

A subcommittee of the Library Diversity Council was charged to evaluate and interrogate the role of policing in the University of Michigan Library. This post explores the evaluation and decision-making processes, while identifying the labor that goes into projects dealing with anti-racist culture change. The group’s research resulted in several recommendations shared with library leadership.

Launching the Digital Preservation Assessment

A grid of nine abstract representations of people and computers rendered in a generic style of illustration. Blurry pastel colors on white backgrounds seem to suggest floating computer screens and groups of human figures in conversation. Note: DALL·E mini is open source. AI-generated images do not fall under copyright because they lack the element of human creative expression. Source: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/us-copyright-office-rules-ai-art-cant-be-copyrighted-180979808/

The University of Michigan Library’s efforts to develop our digital preservation program created an opportunity to request additional support during the annual budget cycle. With only a few months to draft recommendations, the Digital Preservation Steering Committee performed an assessment survey to gather feedback from stakeholders across the library.

Lost in Translation: An Exploratory Study on Non-English Catalog Searching

Screen shot of Library Catalog Search results, and interview participant and interviewer.

The University of Michigan Library is home to a vast collection of materials representing dozens of languages. U-M Library Catalog Search, however, can cause difficulties for users searching for materials in languages other than English. In Summer 2021 we conducted an exploratory study on the experience of searching for non-English materials within U-M Library Catalog Search in order to better understand challenges users face, how they overcome them, and what we can do to mitigate the problem.

Replacing the Traditional Library “One-shot” Session with a Series of Online Videos: What Do Students Prefer?

Image of a computer playing a series of five videos.

Have you ever done a one-shot instruction session and thought, “I’m overwhelmed with the amount of information I talked about and I’m a librarian. I wonder how the students feel?” I felt that after teaching several capstone engineering courses. So I decided to create a series of videos instead. This blog post describes what I learned about students’ library learning preferences.

Adapting Operations Data Collection in Response to COVID-19 (Part 2)

A graph showing "percent of reservations kept" overlaid with an image of a COVID-19 coronavirus

The interruption to library services caused by COVID-19 meant we needed to quickly develop new data collection strategies to give us information to manage our modified services for the 2020-2021 academic year. It also gave us an opportunity to conduct a deep reflection and assessment of how our regular collection had been going, and to be ready to make changes as we reinstituted more regular services. In two posts, we describe the evolution of our data collection efforts.

Adapting Operations Data Collection in Response to COVID-19 (Part 1)

A graph showing "percent of reservations kept" overlaid with an image of a COVID-19 coronavirus

The interruption to library services caused by COVID-19 meant we needed to quickly develop new data collection strategies to give us information to manage our modified services for the 2020-2021 academic year. It also gave us an opportunity to conduct a deep reflection and assessment of how our regular collection had been going, and to be ready to make changes as we reinstituted more regular services. In two posts, we describe the evolution of our data collection efforts.

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