An Early Predecessor of "American Beauty"?

Peter Tröschel (1615-1680). Hierinnen mann befind dass recht loss Haussgesind. [Nuremberg:] Paulus Fürst, [ca. 1650].

We have recently purchased an engraved broadside (259 x 339 mm.) depicting what at first sight looks like a regular scene of family life in the seventeenth century. However, a closer examination reveals a very different picture: a dysfunctional household or, to be more precise, a satire of domestic happiness...

Folk Rhymes on the Flyleaf

Flyleaf rhyme: "Richard Briscoe is the owner's name. Dare not to steal this Book for fear of shame. Whoever thou be, as dare to steal this book from me, I'll spend twice the book but well rewarded thou shall be."

Rhymes that identify book owners, warn or threaten book thieves, and extol the virtues of learning appear in interesting variations, particularly on the pages of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century school books.

Fun with Fairy Tales: Students Get Acquainted with Fantastical Children's Book Illustrations

Binding of The Sleeping Beauty

The class, German 386 / Fairy Tales, is devoted primarily to the tales collected by the Brothers Grimm just over 200 years ago, while also exploring the structural elements of fairy tales and the stories’ ongoing influence in contemporary society. Mary Gell brought her class of 32 students to the Special Collections Library in June to give students a sense of the role illustrations have played in the reception and popularization of fairy tales.

Violence as Entertainment: An Exhibit for the 2014 Midwest Victorian Studies Association Conference

Hand raising a rod

The Midwest Victorian Studies Association (MVSA) held its annual conference in Ann Arbor this year in April, presenting a prime opportunity for us to showcase some of the University of Michigan Special Collections Library’s relevant materials. The Librarian for English Language and Literature, Sigrid Cordell, and student University Library Associate Ikumi Crocoll worked together to create an exhibit that related to this year’s conference theme, Victorian violence.

Lee Walp Family Juvenile Book Collection in Mirlyn

original drawing and inscription by Dr. Seuss: "For the Lee Walps"

The Lee Walp Family Juvenile Book Collection is a trove of children’s literature, representing authors and illustrators throughout the 20th century both through published works and through correspondence, clippings, and original artwork. The collection is now completely cataloged and can be requested in Mirlyn for use in the Reading Room.

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