Posts tagged "exhibits"
from Beyond the Reading Room

A New Online Exhibit from Special Collections: Sacred Hands

Mich. Ms. 22, detail of fol. 83v. The Evangelist Mark, from a Book of Gospels Greece, end of tenth-beginning of eleventh century; miniatures: beginning of twelfth century

We are pleased to announce the launching of a new online exhibit: "Sacred Hands." This virtual display highlights an extraordinary selection of manuscripts containing the sacred texts of the three Abrahamic religions: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. It includes manuscripts that are highly treasured for their textual and artistic value, such as a tenth-century Torah, the earliest known papyrus of St. Paul's Epistles, early illuminated Byzantine manuscripts of the Four Gospels,...

Written Culture of Christian Egypt: Coptic Manuscripts from the University of Michigan Collection

A section from Mich. Ms. 158.5 Book of Jeremiah. Sahidic Dialect. Verso. Parchment. White Monastery, Sohag (Egypt). ca. 10th century. Parchment; 36.5 x 27.8 cm.

We are pleased to announce the opening of a new online exhibit: Written Culture of Christian Egypt: Coptic Manuscripts from the University of Michigan Collection. This online display is a virtual record of an actual physical exhibit that took place at the Audubon Room of the University of Michigan Library between November 12, 2018 and February 17, 2019. Curated by Alin Suciu and Frank Feder (Göttingen Academy of Sciences and Humanities, Germany), and with the collaboration of Pablo Alvarez (...

New Exhibit and Opening | Other Crusoes, Other Islands

map of Venezuela including several islands off the coast

The Special Collections Research Center announces a new exhibit, Other Crusoes, Other Islands: Mapping a Complex Legacy. On the 300th anniversary of the publication of The Life and Surprising Adventures of Robinson Crusoe, of York, Mariner, this exhibit interrogates the troubled legacy of Daniel Defoe’s seminal English novel. It also explores how creators have pushed back against the colonialist, hyper-masculine, and racist ethos of the text by using the castaway narrative to explore self-...

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