Posts tagged "feedback"

Exploratory Research After Launch: Interviewing Users About Library Search

Word cloud of interview themes, such as results relevance, filtering, record display, call number, course reserves, advanced search, Boolean queries, etc.

U-M Library’s Library Search launched in 2018 as a unified search engine application containing five previously distinct interfaces: Catalog, Articles, Databases, Online Journals, and Library Websites. Library Search was a big change for users, and an increase in user support requests suggested that further exploration was needed to pinpoint user pain points. The authors began an exploratory study that helped understand users’ experiences and identified areas for continued work.

Applying Iterative Design to Assessment

Iteration in the design thinking process: Understand, Explore, and Materialize categories, with steps of empathize, define, ideate, prototype, test, implement.

A project team charged with providing staff training activities approached the project assessment with an iterative design lens, allowing for responsive and timely development of multiple opportunities for staff engagement around organizational and personal change. The team tried out different assessment techniques related to the opportunities offered.

Data Collection and Assessment in Human Resources

Image of bar chart and magnifying glass

Assessment and research activities focused on the U-M Library faculty, staff, and student experiences are happening regularly, and often the Library Human Resources (LHR) team is contributing to these activities if not leading the research. This work can focus on quantitative data, qualitative data, or take a hybrid approach, and can involve surveys, interviews, and/or some general number-crunching. This post looks over some recent HR assessment projects.

Integrating Feedback on the Fly: Intercept Interviews

Flyer which encourages participation in intercept interview: 10 minutes for a chance at 10 dollars.

When developing or reconsidering a library service, sometimes you can get stuck in your head. You go back and forth with your colleagues proposing different ways of doing things. You model out different scenarios, do an environmental scan, read the literature, weigh pros and cons but you still can’t decide how to proceed. A great way to figure out how to move forward is to go to your users for feedback by employing intercept interviews.