Posts tagged "data analysis"
from Tiny Studies

Using Analytics to Advance our Future Instruction Services

Image of poster presented at the 2018 Library Assessment Conference.

The 2018 Library Assessment Conference (https://libraryassessment.org/) brought together a community of practitioners and researchers who have responsibility or interest in the broad field of library assessment. This post recaps the conference poster content presented by Laurie Alexander and Doreen Bradley about how analytics advanced the Library's internal understanding of the course-integrated instruction provided by Library staff.

Increasing Access to Document Delivery Through Ongoing Data Analysis

Person handing a book to another person

Document Delivery provides traditional Interlibrary Loan Borrowing service, and scanning and delivery service for books and articles from material owned by the U-M Library. As a result of a successful pilot to provide free Local Document Delivery for faculty and graduate students, the department next sought to change the fee-based service for undergraduate students and staff. Departmental managers wondered: What would happen if we made scanning and delivery service free for these patron groups?

What's Happening in Our Library Spaces?

A picture of six different spaces in different University of Michigan library locations showing students studying, in the Bert's study lounge, in the stacks as well as a picture of the 2nd floor of the Duderstadt Center and an exterior shot of Tappan hall.

There are many ways to record and analyze what is happening in the University of Michigan libraries over time. The more we understand how users are engaging with our spaces, the more we can do to meet their needs. But how do you get a handle on such a big question (library space use)? What data do you collect and how do you break it down?

Explorations into Undergraduate Use of Collections

A collage of some of the book covers for titles recommended by incoming Wolverines.

The U-M Shapiro Undergraduate Library (UGL) collection serves the course-related and extracurricular information needs of U-M undergraduate students. This collection encourages students to explore new ideas, gain research skills, and become lifelong learners. How can we tailor this small collection (approximately 175,000 volumes) to meet their current needs?

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