Posts tagged "data analysis"
from Tiny Studies

Adapting Operations Data Collection in Response to COVID-19 (Part 2)

A graph showing "percent of reservations kept" overlaid with an image of a COVID-19 coronavirus

The interruption to library services caused by COVID-19 meant we needed to quickly develop new data collection strategies to give us information to manage our modified services for the 2020-2021 academic year. It also gave us an opportunity to conduct a deep reflection and assessment of how our regular collection had been going, and to be ready to make changes as we reinstituted more regular services. In two posts, we describe the evolution of our data collection efforts.

Adapting Operations Data Collection in Response to COVID-19 (Part 1)

A graph showing "percent of reservations kept" overlaid with an image of a COVID-19 coronavirus

The interruption to library services caused by COVID-19 meant we needed to quickly develop new data collection strategies to give us information to manage our modified services for the 2020-2021 academic year. It also gave us an opportunity to conduct a deep reflection and assessment of how our regular collection had been going, and to be ready to make changes as we reinstituted more regular services. In two posts, we describe the evolution of our data collection efforts.

What Happens When Ebooks Are Free-to-Read?

Image of a Google impact map, depicting content requests by world location.

Between March 20 and August 31, 2020, the University of Michigan Press made all the titles in the Library-hosted ebook collection, UMP EBC, free-to-read. During this period, U-M Press staff gathered use data in the hope of assessing the impact of free-to-read content while informing the future business strategy. Three different assessment efforts are described in this post.

Approaches to Library Assessment Using Multiple Data Sources

Image of 3 circles, representing a survey, a data store, and a library shelving area.

This blog post presents how the use of multiple streams of data benefited two recent U-M Library studies. For example, one recent study merged survey data, U-M human resources data, and Library document delivery data to provide a very rich picture of how diverse groups on campus use and experience the Library’s document delivery service. Some advantages of joining multiple data sources in assessment projects are discussed in the context of the two example studies.

So, We’ve Got This Data… (Part 2)

Line image of questions to ask about data: what do we want to know, what could data show, who do we want to show, why do we want to know, and what does the data represent.

Chances are the work processes you already have in place are generating data that you could be using to learn more about those processes. In this second blog post, the author continues to highlight steps for working with data that is generated by your daily tasks.

So, We’ve Got This Data… (Part 1)

Line image of questions to ask about data: what do we want to know, what could data show, who do we want to show, why do we want to know, and what does the data represent.

Chances are the work processes you already have in place are generating data that you could be using to learn more about those processes. In two blog posts, the author shares some steps for working with data that is generated by your daily tasks.

Data Collection and Assessment in Human Resources

Image of bar chart and magnifying glass

Assessment and research activities focused on the U-M Library faculty, staff, and student experiences are happening regularly, and often the Library Human Resources (LHR) team is contributing to these activities if not leading the research. This work can focus on quantitative data, qualitative data, or take a hybrid approach, and can involve surveys, interviews, and/or some general number-crunching. This post looks over some recent HR assessment projects.

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