Posts tagged "Survey"
from Tiny Studies

Data Collection and Assessment in Human Resources

Image of bar chart and magnifying glass

Assessment and research activities focused on the U-M Library faculty, staff, and student experiences are happening regularly, and often the Library Human Resources (LHR) team is contributing to these activities if not leading the research. This work can focus on quantitative data, qualitative data, or take a hybrid approach, and can involve surveys, interviews, and/or some general number-crunching. This post looks over some recent HR assessment projects.

Assessing Student Learning in Library Instruction: A Faculty Perspective

Word cloud image: finding sources, library organization, using & understanding sources, nature of information, etc.

Assessing library impact on student learning is essential for demonstrating libraries’ integrated value and commitment to higher education. In 2018 the author investigated faculty perceptions of student learning in library instruction sessions, and as a result, revealed that faculty observe enhanced learning when their students participate in library instruction opportunities.

Let’s Talk About Surveys (Part 2)

happy face with a check mark next to it followed by a neutral and sad faces

Continuing the discussion about survey design (see Let's Talk about Surveys, Part 1), you’ve decided a survey is an appropriate methodology for what you want to find out and are thinking about what questions you want to ask. But how you ask these questions and structure them within the survey itself, as well as the question formats and options you give people for responding all require careful consideration.

Let’s Talk About Surveys (Part 1)

happy face with a check mark next to it followed by a neutral and sad faces

Doing a survey is often the default research method thought of when you need to answer questions about what people like, expect, or want, among other things. While surveys are likely to be considered the easiest option, you can’t conflate “easy to create” with “easy to create well.” Even if a survey is an appropriate methodology for the question you’re looking to answer, the questions you ask, the way you ask them, and the options you give people for responding all require a thoughtful approach...

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