Posts tagged "Survey"
from Tiny Studies

Launching the Digital Preservation Assessment

A grid of nine abstract representations of people and computers rendered in a generic style of illustration. Blurry pastel colors on white backgrounds seem to suggest floating computer screens and groups of human figures in conversation. Note: DALL·E mini is open source. AI-generated images do not fall under copyright because they lack the element of human creative expression. Source: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/us-copyright-office-rules-ai-art-cant-be-copyrighted-180979808/

The University of Michigan Library’s efforts to develop our digital preservation program created an opportunity to request additional support during the annual budget cycle. With only a few months to draft recommendations, the Digital Preservation Steering Committee performed an assessment survey to gather feedback from stakeholders across the library.

What Happens When Ebooks Are Free-to-Read?

Image of a Google impact map, depicting content requests by world location.

Between March 20 and August 31, 2020, the University of Michigan Press made all the titles in the Library-hosted ebook collection, UMP EBC, free-to-read. During this period, U-M Press staff gathered use data in the hope of assessing the impact of free-to-read content while informing the future business strategy. Three different assessment efforts are described in this post.

How Undergraduates Evaluate Sources

Photo of a card sorting exercise, with 5 columns of content attached to a wall.

Source evaluation is an important skill in our information landscape, which is why librarians teach this concept to students during course-integrated information literacy sessions. As part of an IMLS grant, our research team is conducting a two part study to understand the impact of library instruction on students’ evaluation of sources. In this post, we discuss the use of a questionnaire and role-playing interviews to learn more about students’ confidence in their evaluation abilities.

Approaches to Library Assessment Using Multiple Data Sources

Image of 3 circles, representing a survey, a data store, and a library shelving area.

This blog post presents how the use of multiple streams of data benefited two recent U-M Library studies. For example, one recent study merged survey data, U-M human resources data, and Library document delivery data to provide a very rich picture of how diverse groups on campus use and experience the Library’s document delivery service. Some advantages of joining multiple data sources in assessment projects are discussed in the context of the two example studies.

Applying Iterative Design to Assessment

Iteration in the design thinking process: Understand, Explore, and Materialize categories, with steps of empathize, define, ideate, prototype, test, implement.

A project team charged with providing staff training activities approached the project assessment with an iterative design lens, allowing for responsive and timely development of multiple opportunities for staff engagement around organizational and personal change. The team tried out different assessment techniques related to the opportunities offered.

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